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20120910
20120910
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. thank you, god bless you, god bless these united states. >> well, making it up a little bit. god bless you and god bless the united states. there was a part of that that really caught my ear and it's when he said the road ahead may be longer. now, let me think about that a minute. four years ago, we started on this same road. four years later, the road is longer? how does a road get longer if you've been travelling on it for four years already. does that mean we've actually gone backwards p and start all over again to try to catch up? maybe that would tell us all we need to know about how to vote in november, if we're actually further behind than we were when we started off the road. just a thought for my part. [applause]. all week long democrats are asked whether americans with better off than they were four years ago. president barack obama took office, the economy was 9 full percent of gdp. we were losing 750,000 jobs, are we doing better than at that today? the answer is yes. >> that's a big surprise to most americans. i'm glad he revealed that to us, with 23 million american out o
of economic might. according to the annual survey from the world economic forum, the united states of america has slipped to seventh in competitiveness down from number one in 2008 when president obama was elected to the white house. joining me now, lou dobbs, host of "lou dobbs tonight" on fox business network and a syndicated radio host. and the headline in the albuquerque journal is, dear america: nobody shouts, we're number seven! [laughter] number seven! >> well, we could start a shout too. we're also number 14, number 29 whether we're talking about mathematics and natural sciences test scores. ball of it comes down o this -- but all of it comes down to this reflection of not being able to shout -- megyn: why is the world economic forum telling us we're so much less competitive than we used to be? >> they seem to perceive a certain mistrust on business and this government. i don't know where they got that. they seem to have noticed we're $16 trillion in debt which exceeds our national gross domestic product. megyn: talk about the credit downgrade. >> the credit downgrade which, by the wa
because he is a living safely in exile in the united states ever since. on friday, bolivian president r. ellis said the obama administration had rejected bolivia's extradition request on the grounds of civilian leader cannot be tried for a military's crimes. morales called the was a paradise of impunity. >> the u.s. cannot send a letter saying civil society cannot be responsible for military actions. i reject these claims. i do not agree. this is a pretext for the u.s. to turn into a haven for delinquents in a paradise of impunity. it is easy for us to see that a country that is never respected the dignity and sovereignty of latin america cannot extradite someone is done so much harm to the libyan people and works for the american empire. th>> to see a full interview wih president morales you can go to democracynow.org. in a separate move, this government has filed a court briefing declaring former presidenmexican president saddad joys amenity for connecticut civil suit for alleged war crimes. the suit accuses him of responsibility for 1997 massacre in a village of acteal when governmen
is that hundreds of recently rounded up suspected insurgents are in the hands of the united states. there is still a fundamental dispute between u.s. commanders and the afghan government over what sort of process the afghans will use to continue to detain inmates and how they're going to try to adjudicate the release of some of them. afghanistan does not have on its books any sort of laws to indefinitely detained people for security violations. will they seek to put some of them on trial and release others? >> it is symptomatic of the real breakdown in trust between washington and the afghan authorities in the run-up to this handover. >> what is particularly striking about today's event is that senior nato commanders did not show up. general allan, the american and passenger, none of them were there. it was left to a junior ranking officer to take the american position on the dais. >> at the same time, we have these reports coming now of one london-based group that the taliban are interested in negotiating and it was quickly denied. what do you read in the political side of this? >> president karz
. >>> the drenching that parts of the united states got last week, including tornadoes out in queens, not really helping parched farmland. there are no farms in queens, are there? this afternoon we're going to get exclusive details on the economic impact from our senior economics reporter steve leisman. he's here live. >> in about three minutes we're going to get an e-mail from the guy that runs the farm in queens. it is a big impact from what's a small sector of the economy and it could even have an impact on the presidential election. in a detailed study of the summer's drought which scored soybeans, corn and other crops across the nation, macro economic advisors out of st. louis estimate it could shave as much as a half point off gross domestic product this year. that's a big hit to a $13 trillion economy from a total farm sector that accounts for just -- wait for it now -- 1% of the nation's output. ben herzon is the economist who did the study. pe explai he explains the drought's outside impact. >> even though it only accounts for 1% of the economy, big changes in farm output can show up in
, you spoke about they and you criticize third united states in the area for having what you call a reflexive reaction against any palestinian use of the unite it nations. >> guest: on the -- >> utilization of the united nations do you think the united states is standing in at the way of 0 broader peace evident in the middle east. >> guest: i don't say america is standing in the way. what i can say is that it will require a sustained and determined effort by the u.s., working with some of the countries in the region, and partners in europe, to bring about peace in the region. it has not been sustained. in fact i'm not sure i can say there is a peace process today, and i think the u.s. has such a pivotal role to play, and both parties look to the u.s. leadership. there were times when they looked to see if one had gotten very close. i was in sheikh when president clinton was trying to get a solution, working during night, and at that point it seemed very close -- this was 2000, around there. since then we haven't been that close and there hasn't been a real effort to get the partie
. when you see these numbers, you'll say there has to be a way. in 2011, the united states took in about $1.1 trillion in income taxes. individual. but look at the bottom number below it. i mean, this makes my jaws drop. total tax break, credits, exclusions, your mortgage interest duction, state and local taxes. more money than we took in. okay, whatever you think about specific deduction, this screen is everything you need to know about how our tax system is really broken. so ending the state and local deduction alone would be $862.2 billion. the mortgage interest deduction, $214.6 billion. now, those are exactly the deductions mitt romney said he'd cut at a close doored fund-raiser in april. a reporter at the event wrote quote mitt romney said i'm probably going to eliminate for high income people, the second home mortgage deduction, romney said, adding he would also eliminate for state and property taxes. he made it clear it's for higher income people he wants to get rid of some of these deductions and mitt romney's defenders -- they can make the math work, so can that they? one is do
, when we talk of united nations in this context, who are we talking about? is it the states who take the decisions and give us a mandate, who give us the resources required to carry out the mandate, or sometimes not give us the resources to carry out the mandate. were we are talking about the secretary on the secretary general. because the u.n. is us. your government and mine. sometimes we talk about the u.n. aspect and by doing that, we are giving the governments who are ultimately responsible for action or inaction in some of these ways, an alibi and blaming the secretary and secretary general. one of my predecessors used to say that we often refer to the secretary general as cheap for short. history doesn't stand for the secretary general to be the scapegoat. [laughter] hosni mubarak you are the world scapegoating sheet. >> we have to be careful not to use it as an alibi. really, when we talk of the failures of somalia, rwanda, bosnia, and i tried to explain the unwillingness of government and troops -- we made mistakes. we could have done things differently. in the investigations
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)